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8/10/15
This post was originally published on the Interaction Institute for Social Change’s blog by Curtis Ogden on August 6, 2015. “Processes aimed at racial equity change can overlook the privileged side of inequity.” -Gita Gulati-Partee and Maggie Potapchuk, “Paying Attention to White Culture and Privilege: A Missing Link to Advancing Racial Equity” In a number of social change networks that I support
8/6/15
On Monday afternoons at my farm, we scramble to harvest the final fruits and roots for our CSA, and to label and fill bags of herbs for Tuesday restaurant deliveries. We are sunburned, wet-socked, and ready—when we slam the door of the finally full coolbot—to take our boots off and find dinner. I am not always eager to get in the car and drive anywhere besides home. But every other week, once the
8/3/15
On a picturesque, sunny July day, I had the opportunity to get out on the water for a tour of Fox Point Oysters. Located in Little Bay, part of the Great Bay Estuary in New Hampshire, Fox Point Oysters provides fresh, sustainable, and delicious oysters. Behind the farm stands Laura Ward, an artist by training who got hooked on to oyster farming in 2012. The farm currently spans across 1.5 acres,
7/30/15
This post originally appeared on the Coalition of Immokalee Workers' blog July 6, 2015. “Success” of “innovative movements” by workers from Vermont to Florida earns spread in U.S.’s most-read newspaper… Just in time for the Fourth of July weekend, the movement for Worker-driven Social Responsibility (WSR) rocketed into the national spotlight thanks to a great new article on the front page of last
7/27/15
There’s no vegetable more basic than a potato. This humble, tuberous root crop, Solanum tuberosum, grows in the dark, hidden from view most of the year, and emerges late when the air is frosty. It’s not as exciting as kale, not as exotic as kohlrabi, and even has "relatives" that seem nicer—the sweet potato and the yam. But when it comes to taking our local food system forward in the state of

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