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Race, Equity, & Social Justice

Imagine, if you will, that you come from a hot, dry place. And now you are “resettled” in a place that is green, cold, and wet. You speak a language, in fact a number of dialects, so unlike English that English sounds like no language at all. You are a member of the Somali Bantu community in Lewiston, Maine, a small city of some 36,000 people where about 22 percent are at or below the poverty
By Philip Korman, Jeff Cole, Andrew Morehouse, Ellen Parker, and Frank Mangan This post was originally published by The Daily Hampshire Gazette , August 19th, 2015 The Massachusetts Department of Transitional Assistance recently created a win-win situation for the Commonwealth, seizing a chance to improve public health, build our economy and support local farmers. Building on its vision to
This post was originally published on the Interaction Institute for Social Change’s blog by Curtis Ogden on March 7, 2013. It is offered as a Food Policy Resource for the "Overview of Collective Impact & Its Application for Food Policy Councils" Webinar . In a fascinating article in Fast Company , entitled “The Secrets of Generation Flux,” Robert Safian acknowledges that in these uncertain
As a youth I can say that it’s not everyday your voice has the chance to be heard. But last year, a few other youth from Connecticut, along with myself got that chance. You see; we had become a part of something called the FJYC (Food Justice Youth Corps), a program that enabled high school youth along with AmeriCorps VISTAs to come together and discuss important food justice issues that affect us
This past July 4th, Share Our Strength , in collaboration with a leading advertising agency, filmmakers, and media outlets, launched a public awareness campaign that deftly challenges assumptions about America’s “greatness,” perhaps even our sense of national identity and the direction of our moral compass in the face of our nation’s ongoing hunger epidemic. In a series of PSAs that are a part of
This post was originally published on the Interaction Institute for Social Change’s blog by Curtis Ogden on August 6, 2015. “Processes aimed at racial equity change can overlook the privileged side of inequity.” -Gita Gulati-Partee and Maggie Potapchuk, “Paying Attention to White Culture and Privilege: A Missing Link to Advancing Racial Equity” In a number of social change networks that I support
This post originally appeared on the Coalition of Immokalee Workers' blog July 6, 2015. “Success” of “innovative movements” by workers from Vermont to Florida earns spread in U.S.’s most-read newspaper… Just in time for the Fourth of July weekend, the movement for Worker-driven Social Responsibility (WSR) rocketed into the national spotlight thanks to a great new article on the front page of last
This post was originally published by Bill Duesing on June 29, 2015. View the original post here . There has been remarkable positive movement toward growing food for people near where they live, which is often called agroecology. Methods used in this local, healthy and sustainable food system model maximize use of local resources, including sun and waste products and minimize use of fossil fuels
Our food system encompasses the growers, the producers, the distributors, but also those in the service industry. For many of the people who serve us food all day, every day, putting food on their own tables is a challenge. In Rhode Island, food service workers earn a meager $2.89 an hour -- just 30% of Rhode Island’s minimum wage. Forced to rely on the generosity of strangers, much of the food
Producer cooperatives have had a central role in American agriculture for the past 150 years and are continuing to grow in Maine and the Northeast today. In a producer cooperative, individual producers, such as farmers or fishermen, are owners of the cooperative, which provides services such as marketing, aggregation, distribution, and value-added processing. Producer cooperatives can provide