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Policy & Advocacy

10/9/18
Editor's Note: This post by Ricardo Salvador, Director, Food & Environment Program of Union of Concerned Scientists was originally published on October 8, 2018 on the UCS website . Do you have a story or article you'd like us to share? Update 10/9/18: “White Earth Food Recovery Project” was corrected to “White Earth Land Recovery Project” and “Ojibwe” was corrected to “Anishinabe.” “Tribes
9/13/18
The Food Solutions New England Process Team (our "steering" or advisory team) has voted to endorse the Campaign for Real Meals , recognizing the leverage to be gained in making specific targets more visible in the massive food service industry in North America. Industrial food service represents a $51 billion sector in the US alone, with three firms - Sodexo, Aramark and Compass Group -
7/30/18
This week's lead blog post comes from our colleagues at Real Food Challenge , active members of the Food Solutions New England regional network. Real Food Challenge is excited to announce a technical update to our Real Food Standards! In an effort to keep our Standards aligned with changes in the food industry, Real Food Challenge students and alumni leaders have conducted research in
6/4/18
In our region, the Connecticut River Valley in Massachusetts, there is a lot of talk right now amongst community food organizations about the whiteness of the majority of people leading those organizations, and what that means in building an equitable, resilient food system. There’s also talk about the Farm Bill reauthorization (which is underway right now) and the impact it could have on
3/5/18
The Shah Family Foundation has been working closely with The Boston Public Schools Food and Nutritional Services and the City of Boston on a pilot project in East Boston schools that provides fresh, healthier food to students in BPS. This program creates finishing kitchens at satellite schools who have traditionally relied on frozen, vended meals. Students in these schools are now served fresh
1/31/18
In the field, I often hear the question from partner organizations or institutions: “Why is evaluation important?” and “Why do we need to do this?”. As an educator and an agriculturalist I cringe at the idea that we would never make room in the cycle to step back and assess our work, reflect upon what has value and what serves purpose, and what needs to drop away to make room for new growth.
12/12/17
This installment was originally posted on the Farm to Institution New England (FINE) blog . INSTALLMENT NO. 6 OF 6 The Power of Institutions to Change the Food System New England schools, hospitals, and institutions of higher education serve approximately 3.8 million people every day and spend hundreds of millions of dollars on food and beverage each year. Increasingly, these institutions are
10/30/17
This installment was originally posted on the Farm to Institution New England (FINE) blog . INSTALLMENT NO. 3 OF 6 Schools, institutions of higher education and hospitals in New England spend hundreds of millions of dollars on food and beverages annually. Institutions have the potential to significantly impact regional economies and communities by using their tremendous purchasing power to invest
10/16/17
This installment was originally posted on the Farm to Institution New England (FINE) blog . INSTALLMENT NO. 2 OF 6 Local food programs at New England schools, institutions of higher education, and hospitals are increasing in breadth and depth, however, there is no agreed upon definition of the term “local.” FINE does not assign a set definition of local when collecting primary data but rather
10/3/17
This piece was originally posted by Sarah Schumann on September 18, 2017 on the Eating with the Ecosystem blog . New England fisheries are at a crossroads. This heritage industry, which has provided livelihoods for so many for so long in our region, now finds itself challenged by a changing and unpredictable natural environment, an increasingly cutthroat global marketplace, shifts in demographics

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