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Networks & Collaboration

Race and equity are concerns in all parts of our society, and the food system is no different. From food apartheid to low wages, the food system reflects discrimination in zoning, education, housing, labor protections, and in electoral representation. Identifying what we can do to unravel systemic oppression, and then aligning our institutions to take up the tasks, is a challenge for any
This installment was originally posted on the Farm to Institution New England (FINE) blog . INSTALLMENT NO. 3 OF 6 Schools, institutions of higher education and hospitals in New England spend hundreds of millions of dollars on food and beverages annually. Institutions have the potential to significantly impact regional economies and communities by using their tremendous purchasing power to invest
This post originally appeared on Vermont Farm to Plate Features . When you ask people their definition of the Vermont food economy, they’ll often talk about farms, farmers’ markets or CSAs. What’s often missing from the conversation are the supply chain of local businesses such as distributors, food processors and manufacturers, and seed, feed, and equipment dealers. Vermont’s local food economy
This installment was originally posted on the Farm to Institution New England (FINE) blog . INSTALLMENT NO. 2 OF 6 Local food programs at New England schools, institutions of higher education, and hospitals are increasing in breadth and depth, however, there is no agreed upon definition of the term “local.” FINE does not assign a set definition of local when collecting primary data but rather
This post was originally published on the Interaction Institute for Social Change blog by Curtis Ogden on October 2, 2017. “We cannot live for ourselves alone. Our lives are connected by a thousand invisible threads, and along those sympathetic fibers, our actions run as causes and return to us as results.” – Herman Melville Last week I worked with the Backbone Team of Food Solutions New England
This piece was originally posted by Sarah Schumann on September 18, 2017 on the Eating with the Ecosystem blog . New England fisheries are at a crossroads. This heritage industry, which has provided livelihoods for so many for so long in our region, now finds itself challenged by a changing and unpredictable natural environment, an increasingly cutthroat global marketplace, shifts in demographics
UPDATE: Read Migrant Justice's announcement on their agreement with Ben & Jerry’s! Dairy workers kicked off the “Human Rights Can’t Wait” speaking tour through the Northeast September 13, engaging hundreds of students and community members. Presentations included a packed house at Columbia Law School, a community dialogue at the MayDay space in Brooklyn, and a full day at Yale University with
This installment was originally posted on the Farm to Institution New England blog . Welcome to Measuring Up , a six-part blog series designed to provide an introduction to the importance of data in understanding the farm to institution landscape in New England. There are 4,628 K-12 schools, 210 colleges and universities, and 256 hospitals that provide dining services in New England. In total,
In June 2017, Food Solutions New England (FSNE) conducted its first Network Health Assessment. The Assessment was developed to help FSNE organizers better understand network participation and impacts. Over 200 people participated in the assessment, which was distributed through our newsletter list and social media channels. Results from the survey highlight a number of important findings for FSNE
This post was originally published in The Daily Hampshire Gazette, August 29, 2017, by Claire Morenon and appeared in: CISA Opinion Pieces , News What comes to mind when you think of local food? Bustling farmers markets, charming roadside stands, Community Supported Agriculture barns filling with produce and customers — these are the images that spring to mind for most of us. Indeed, those direct