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Farming & Agriculture

10/19/15
The United States’ food report card is in, and it does not look good at all. 80% failed on sourcing practices and antibiotics usage. Only 5 of the major food chains received a “C” or above. Why should we be concerned? Since the 1950s, feeding farm animals antibiotics has become standard. The problem with this is the overdosage of antibiotics which causes resistances and could cause a disease
10/15/15
In a joint statement by U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Secretary Tom Vilsack and Secretary of Health and Human Services Sylvia Burwell, it was confirmed that sustainability goals will not be incorporated into the 2015 USDA Dietary Guidelines for Americans (DGA). It appears that the exclusion of these goals represents a missed opportunity to embark on a much needed, more holistic approach
10/12/15
Friends and supporters of local farming gathered in Hinsdale, New Hampshire this harvest season to celebrate the permanent protection of Wingate Farm . Olivia Pettengill, the new owner of the Farm, in partnership with her brother James, began the celebration by thanking the groups who worked together to conserve the farm: “We are incredibly fortunate to have access to this prime farmland and to
10/5/15
As a Registered Dietitian, I have worked in hospitals for over 20 years, starting in college, when I helped patients by providing a leaner protein option. I knew I was doing the “right” thing (read as finger air quotes) by recommending a lean chicken breast. Twenty years ago, I would have NEVER doubted that the chicken breast was the healthiest choice or given a second thought about the way that
10/1/15
During autumn in New England, Jews celebrate both our local seasonal abundance as well as Sukkot , a biblical holiday with multiple names and historical meanings. Most generally known as a celebration of the harvest and the last of the three pilgrimage festivals ( Shalosh Regalim ) during the time of the Temple, it was an opportunity to bring offerings and reaffirm commitment to God and community
9/28/15
Imagine, if you will, that you come from a hot, dry place. And now you are “resettled” in a place that is green, cold, and wet. You speak a language, in fact a number of dialects, so unlike English that English sounds like no language at all. You are a member of the Somali Bantu community in Lewiston, Maine, a small city of some 36,000 people where about 22 percent are at or below the poverty
9/21/15
It's hard to keep up with the summertime hustle. I want to soak up every sun ray, every moment that makes summer, summer. This leaves little time for blog writing, Instagram and Facebook because I use my office time for boring things like updating our cash flow statement and tracking expenses. BUT we have had some pretty remarkable things happen here this summer and one that I'd like to take a
9/17/15
Newport, Rhode Island—mansions, yachts, fancy shops, and upscale restaurants and 70 percent of public school students living below poverty level. A surprising dichotomy, and one indicative of another problem facing more than 150,000 Rhode Islanders—food insecurity. In the U. S., more than 15 percent of people, almost 50 million, don’t know from where and when their next meal will come, and
9/14/15
By Philip Korman, Jeff Cole, Andrew Morehouse, Ellen Parker, and Frank Mangan This post was originally published by The Daily Hampshire Gazette , August 19th, 2015 The Massachusetts Department of Transitional Assistance recently created a win-win situation for the Commonwealth, seizing a chance to improve public health, build our economy and support local farmers. Building on its vision to
9/8/15
I worked in the restaurant world for many years prior to coming to the health care side of the business, operating mainly small bistros that sourced mostly local and sustainable foods. When the opportunity arose to start to do the same at the hospital, it was like a dream come true. It was at my first New Hampshire Health Care Without Harm meeting that I met Carol and Theresa from Miles Smith

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