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Farming & Agriculture

9/13/18
The Food Solutions New England Process Team (our "steering" or advisory team) has voted to endorse the Campaign for Real Meals , recognizing the leverage to be gained in making specific targets more visible in the massive food service industry in North America. Industrial food service represents a $51 billion sector in the US alone, with three firms - Sodexo, Aramark and Compass Group -
9/9/18
Today's post is from our friends at Real Pickles! Come visit them (and Food Solutions New England) at the upcoming Boston Local Food Festival on September 16th! ------------ As you may know, here at Real Pickles we are deeply committed to buying our vegetables only from Northeast family farms and selling our products only within the Northeast . One way in which we are able to achieve this, and in
8/6/18
We are blessed in New England with a long tradition of farmers markets throughout the growing season. The number of active markets has increased and the seasons have expanded, with many towns boasting winter markets as well. These direct-to-consumer distribution methods are an important part of the "mix" that creates a vibrant local food economy, keeps money circulating in our local economy and
6/26/18
From our friends at Farm to Institution New England (FINE) Last week, the Union of Concerned Scientists (UCS) released a new 50-State Food System Scorecard , which ranks U.S. states based on farm and food health, sustainability and equity. The scorecard highlights areas of success and potential improvement for states – and it can help food system stakeholders identify other states that are doing
6/8/18
Food Solutions New England longtime participant and Process Team member Niaz Dorry updates us from the road. Greetings from Charleston, South Carolina! I'm writing you at the end of the first week of America the Bountiful Tour - a two-month cross-country trip to visit as many rural fishing and farming communities we can. The reason for this trip is to kick-start my new role as the director of
6/4/18
In our region, the Connecticut River Valley in Massachusetts, there is a lot of talk right now amongst community food organizations about the whiteness of the majority of people leading those organizations, and what that means in building an equitable, resilient food system. There’s also talk about the Farm Bill reauthorization (which is underway right now) and the impact it could have on
4/12/18
Through 400 years of plantation enslavement, lynchings, lost years of family history, loss of earning potential through lack of inheritances, and generations of neglected educational opportunities, African American producers and land owners have been placed seriously behind the starting line without the proverbial boots or straps. Given the tremendous losses throughout centuries of state
4/10/18
The reason that I as a Black person work to end inequity in the entire food system is simple: Black farmers currently operate less than 1% of the nation’s farms 85% of the people working the land in the US are Latinx migrant workers Only 2.5% of farms are owned and operated by Latinxs and Hispanics People of color are disproportionately likely to live under food apartheid and suffer from diabetes
2/2/18
The Monadnock Farm & Community Coalition (MFCC) has announced the launch of a new resource for Coalition partners and community members: a visual and narrative portfolio depicting the array of work people in the Monadnock Region are doing around issues of local food and the ways these individuals experience, relate with, and find meaning in the work. The photographic and written depictions,
1/31/18
In the field, I often hear the question from partner organizations or institutions: “Why is evaluation important?” and “Why do we need to do this?”. As an educator and an agriculturalist I cringe at the idea that we would never make room in the cycle to step back and assess our work, reflect upon what has value and what serves purpose, and what needs to drop away to make room for new growth.

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