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Massachusetts

Massachusetts is a diverse landscape of coastline and beaches, forests and woods, farmlands, rivers and lakes, and mountainous regions. It also has a rich and diverse food system – from varied agriculture, to innovative food processing facilities, to initiatives to improve the health and affordability of food in its communities.

From urban to rural cities and towns, Massachusetts reflects and celebrates the diversity of culture that uniquely exists within its borders. It produces and it fishes!  On its land, we raise poultry, beef and lamb. From its land, we harvest strawberries in June, asparagus in May and cantaloupe in August. From its surrounding waters, we fish shrimp in February and blue fish in June.

Creating conditions for a thriving food system that is economically viable; fair, just and equitable; and ecologically sound is the ultimate goal – a food system that serves all its residents.

Check out these charts showing Massachusetts produce and seafood seasonal availability.

From the blog

10/29/15
Comments being collected now The first complete draft of the Massachusetts Food System Plan was released on Friday, October 23. The plan is available for download at www.mafoodplan.org , and public comments on the draft will be accepted through November 6 . The plan is a comprehensive assessment identifying current strengths of the Commonwealth's food system and opportunities for improvement. "
10/1/15
During autumn in New England, Jews celebrate both our local seasonal abundance as well as Sukkot , a biblical holiday with multiple names and historical meanings. Most generally known as a celebration of the harvest and the last of the three pilgrimage festivals ( Shalosh Regalim ) during the time of the Temple, it was an opportunity to bring offerings and reaffirm commitment to God and community
9/14/15
By Philip Korman, Jeff Cole, Andrew Morehouse, Ellen Parker, and Frank Mangan This post was originally published by The Daily Hampshire Gazette , August 19th, 2015 The Massachusetts Department of Transitional Assistance recently created a win-win situation for the Commonwealth, seizing a chance to improve public health, build our economy and support local farmers. Building on its vision to
8/20/15
The Boston Public Market opened its doors on July 30 th , bringing fresh, local food to the people of Boston five days a week and giving them a new opportunity to taste, buy, and learn about the bounty of New England. The 28,000-square-foot Market houses over 35 farmers, fishermen, and food producers from Massachusetts and throughout New England, selling items such as farm fresh produce; meat and
7/6/15
As interns at the Harvard Food Law and Policy Clinic (FLPC), we have many opportunities to connect with innovative leaders and participate in exciting events in the foods system in Boston and beyond. Even so, presenting at the quarterly meeting of the Boston Food Policy Council is not an everyday occurrence. It is, however, one of the unique experiences I have had during my summer at FLPC. On

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