You are here

Massachusetts

Massachusetts is a diverse landscape of coastline and beaches, forests and woods, farmlands, rivers and lakes, and mountainous regions. It also has a rich and diverse food system – from varied agriculture, to innovative food processing facilities, to initiatives to improve the health and affordability of food in its communities.

From urban to rural cities and towns, Massachusetts reflects and celebrates the diversity of culture that uniquely exists within its borders. It produces and it fishes!  On its land, we raise poultry, beef and lamb. From its land, we harvest strawberries in June, asparagus in May and cantaloupe in August. From its surrounding waters, we fish shrimp in February and blue fish in June.

Creating conditions for a thriving food system that is economically viable; fair, just and equitable; and ecologically sound is the ultimate goal – a food system that serves all its residents.

Check out these charts showing Massachusetts produce and seafood seasonal availability.

From the blog

1/23/17
This post originally appeared on Ferment , the Real Pickles blog. The extraordinary political events taking place in our country are affecting us deeply here at Real Pickles Co-operative , as they are for so many others. They highlight how far we have to go to build the just, democratic, and sustainable society we wish to see. We are reminded why all of us here take Real Pickles’ social mission
11/17/16
With 60,000 tons of food wasted in the United States each year, at a cost of nearly $220 billion according to ReFED , wasted food is one of the great challenges facing our nation. Wasted food makes up 21% of all landfill volume, and as it decomposes, it releases methane, a greenhouse gas 25 times more effective than carbon dioxide at trapping heat in Earth’s atmosphere. These consequences are all
9/8/16
This post, by Joshua Berman, Project Coordinator for the Sustainable Business Network , orginally appeared on the Boston Local Food Festival Blog . The city of Boston has a very interesting history, and no, I’m not talking about the pilgrims. I’m talking about the city itself. Boston originated as a trading colony for the British, a booming seaport exporting New England’s fish, farm, and lumber
7/7/16
“You have to be patient, develop trust, and have people go with you.” These were words from Karen Masterson, co-owner of Johnny’s Luncheonette in Newton, MA as she talked about what it takes to align her business with the aspirations of the New England Food Vision . “I’ve been chasing after local vegetables for 13 years. Some small operations cannot afford to do this.” Masterson offered both
7/5/16
Food Solutions New England hosted the 6 th in a series of Regional Food Summits in Bridgeport, CT on June 8–9, 2016. This two-day event featured more than 180 delegates from the six New England states working across the food system. Planners, farmers and farm workers, chefs, funders, government officials, and students came together for discussions on topics including food recovery, policy,

Pages